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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Saving East Coast Sea Life

 

President Obama designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

 

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President Obama designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

How to Save Most Species: Part 1

 

Within decades Earth may lose as many as 50% of the species currently living on our planet. To avert ecological disaster, renowned conservationist and Harvard Professor E.O. Wilson has proposed a radical idea in his book Half-Earth: to set aside half of Earth’s land and sea for nature. Wilson describes his vision and why it could save 80% of species in this conversation with host Steve Curwood.

 

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Top Gear for the Electric Car

 

European nations and marquee car brands are setting a fast pace to electrify personal transport. CarTalk blogger and green car journalist Jim Motavalli explains what’s in play in the current electric and hybrid car revolution, and how these vehicles will benefit the planet.

 

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Obesity and House Dust

 

Certain hormones tell our bodies at times whether or not to create fat cells, and hormone disrupting chemicals can confuse those messages. Such chemicals are found in many consumer items including pesticides, flame retardants, and plastics. They also turn up in house dust, and new research from Duke University found that typical amounts of household dust spurred the growth of mouse fat cells in a lab dish.

 

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A Key to Long-Term Nuclear Waste Storage

 

Finland is moving ahead with a system to store radioactive nuclear waste for 100,000 years, a possible example for other nuclear countries still struggling to come up with a plan. In addition to significant engineering challenges of storing nuclear waste safely, community acceptance is key for success.

 

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Standing Bear Comes in Peace

 

Where there is sea ice, polar bears enjoy the eternal days of the Arctic summer, and one young female seems perfectly at ease – until a strange floating object across the pack ice catches her curiosity. Living on Earth’s Resident Explorer Mark Seth Lender describes her reaction to the ship and the humans who are curiously watching her.

 

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Jim's Bees

 

Bees have remarkable skills to communicate and create wholesome food from flowers. Yet they can also terrify.

 

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Prairie Rattlesnake

 

A few months ago writer Mark Seth Lender met his first Prairie Rattlesnake up close and personal, and found the snake fascinating, and though venomous, not a threat.

 

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Russia Nixes Antarctic Marine Reserve

 

Negotiators from 25 countries met in Germany recently in a bid to create a massive marine reserve in the seas around Antarctica. But at the last minute, Russia backed out of the deal.

 

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Saving East Coast Sea Life

President Obama designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

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DNA Tech for Rhino Protection

With rhinos on the verge of extinction, conservationists are turning to novel efforts to prevent poaching. Living on Earth’s Bobby Bascomb reports on how a DNA database in South Africa is helping law enforcement agents identify the origins of seized rhino horn in order to deter poaching.

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How to Save Most Species: Part 1

Within decades Earth may lose as many as 50% of the species currently living on our planet. To avert ecological disaster, renowned conservationist and Harvard Professor E.O. Wilson has proposed a radical idea in his book Half-Earth: to set aside half of Earth’s land and sea for nature. Wilson describes his vision and why it could save 80% of species in this conversation with host Steve Curwood.

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This Week’s Show
July 21, 2017
listen / download


Steep Wildlife Decline

listen / download
A Living Planet report from the World Wildlife Fund documents based on 2016 data shows a nearly 60% decline in wildlife populations since the 1970’s and warns that two thirds could be gone by the year 2020.

Saving East Coast Sea Life

listen / download
President Obama designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

Science Note: Rats Against Poachers

listen / download
African pouched rats can grow to a yard long, and have a very acute sense of smell. So the US Fish and Wildlife Service is devoting research funds to study whether they can sniff out trafficked animal products and timber.

DNA Tech for Rhino Protection

listen / download
With rhinos on the verge of extinction, conservationists are turning to novel efforts to prevent poaching. Living on Earth’s Bobby Bascomb reports on how a DNA database in South Africa is helping law enforcement agents identify the origins of seized rhino horn in order to deter poaching.

How to Save Most Species: Part 1

listen / download
Within decades Earth may lose as many as 50% of the species currently living on our planet. To avert ecological disaster, renowned conservationist and Harvard Professor E.O. Wilson has proposed a radical idea in his book Half-Earth: to set aside half of Earth’s land and sea for nature. Wilson describes his vision and why it could save 80% of species in this conversation with host Steve Curwood.

How to Save Most Species: Part 2

listen / download
Within decades Earth may lose as many as 50% of the species currently living on our planet. To avert ecological disaster, renowned conservationist and Harvard Professor E.O. Wilson has proposed a radical idea in his book Half-Earth: to set aside half of Earth’s land and sea for nature. Wilson describes his vision and why it could save 80% of species in this conversation with host Steve Curwood.

BirdNote: The Stealthy Shoebill

listen / download
Deep in the swamps of central Africa lives one of the strangest-looking of birds: the Shoebill Stork. The name comes from its huge broad sharp beak, and only about 8000 of these large grey-blue birds survive. But the name misleads: it’s actually related to the pelican.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

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Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Cowee, North Carolina

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion magazine’s longtime feature in which people write about the place they call home. In this week’s edition, songwriter Angela-Faye Martin uses her words and music to picture her North Carolina valley on the edge of the Great Smoky Mountains.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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