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Public Radio's Environmental News Magazine (follow us on Google News)

Guinea Fowl and Tick Control

 

Deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, a debilitating disease if left untreated, and one that’s becoming more common thanks to the warming climate. Now some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to guinea fowl to control ticks. Jenni Doering reports from Exeter, New Hampshire about one family’s experience with these tick-eating machines.

 

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Deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, a debilitating disease if left untreated, and one that’s becoming more common thanks to the warming climate. Now some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to guinea fowl to control ticks. Jenni Doering reports from Exeter, New Hampshire about one family’s experience with these tick-eating machines.

Jane Goodall On 60+ Years of Conservation And Research

 

The iconic Jane Goodall has spent her life advocating for the conservation of the natural world. Sixty years ago on July 14th, 1960, Jane arrived in what is now Gombe National Park, Tanzania, to begin her groundbreaking research on chimpanzees. Jane Goodall joins Steve Curwood to discuss her career studying chimps, the work her organization is doing now, and what we can learn about our relationship with the natural world from the current pandemic.

 

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Dancing with Bees: A Journey Back to Nature

 

The innate curiosity about and connection to the natural world that many of us experience as children are often lost on the path to adulthood. Brigit Strawbridge Howard, author of Dancing with Bees: a Journey Back to Nature, found her way back to a childlike fascination with nature with the help of some of the world's most important pollinators: honeybees, bumblebees, and oft-overlooked solitary bees. Brigit joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the fascinating habits of solitary bees, how to help diverse bee species thrive in your own backyard, and how best to reconnect with nature.

 

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Eye Contact with a Wild Elephant

 

Eye contact can be powerful, a knowing look exchanged between beings. And for Living on Earth’s Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender, nothing compares to catching the eye of a wild elephant.

 

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The Racial Gap of Pollution Responsibility

 

Fine particle air pollution is especially dangerous for human health, and a well-established body of research has found that minority groups are disproportionately exposed. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences documents the racial gap between who’s most responsible for air pollution and who breathes it. Steve Curwood sits down with Dr. Christopher Tessum, lead author of the study.

 

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Redlined Real Estate & Extreme Urban Heat

 

In the 1930s, while the world was digging out of the Great Depression, the US government came up with a plan to rate neighborhoods based on their presumed suitability to receive home loans, with those considered riskiest outlined in red. These “redlined” neighborhoods tended to be in city centers and home to black Americans. Today as climate change exacerbates urban heat, they’re experiencing much higher temperatures than surrounding areas. Vivek Shandas is a lead author of the research and speaks with Bobby Bascomb about the unequal impacts of racist ‘redlining’ practices.

 

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Nuclear Storage Crisis

 

The meltdown at Fukushima in Japan may be grabbing all the headlines, but with the Yucca Mountain project in perpetual limbo the United States has a nuclear storage problem on its hands as well.

 

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Solar Powered Ship

 

The world’s largest solar powered boat made history by circumnavigating the globe. The ship is now busy in the Atlantic collecting data about the Gulf Stream.

 

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Hummingbirds Citizen Science Project

 

The Rufous hummingbird follows the Rocky Mountains to migrate from Alaska to Mexico (Photo: Diana Douglas for Hummingbirds at Home).

 

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Democratic Climate Action Plan

After more than a year of consideration, the members of the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis have released a massive climate action plan that aims to end carbon pollution and build new clean energy and transportation systems, while also helping communities adapt to climate disruption. Select Committee on the Climate Crisis Chair Kathy Castor (D-FL) joins Steve Curwood to discuss what the plan means for environmental policy and environmental justice communities moving forward.

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Guinea Fowl and Tick Control

Deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, a debilitating disease if left untreated, and one that’s becoming more common thanks to the warming climate. Now some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to guinea fowl to control ticks. Jenni Doering reports from Exeter, New Hampshire about one family’s experience with these tick-eating machines.

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Jane Goodall On 60+ Years of Conservation And Research

The iconic Jane Goodall has spent her life advocating for the conservation of the natural world. Sixty years ago on July 14th, 1960, Jane arrived in what is now Gombe National Park, Tanzania, to begin her groundbreaking research on chimpanzees. Jane Goodall joins Steve Curwood to discuss her career studying chimps, the work her organization is doing now, and what we can learn about our relationship with the natural world from the current pandemic.

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This Week’s Show
July 10, 2020
listen / download


Democratic Climate Action Plan

listen / download
After more than a year of consideration, the members of the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis have released a massive climate action plan that aims to end carbon pollution and build new clean energy and transportation systems, while also helping communities adapt to climate disruption. Select Committee on the Climate Crisis Chair Kathy Castor (D-FL) joins Steve Curwood to discuss what the plan means for environmental policy and environmental justice communities moving forward.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
This week, Peter Dykstra and Steve Curwood cover the fall of a major fracking company, the end of the road for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, and the shutdown of the contentious Dakota Access Pipeline pending more environmental review. They discuss President Trump’s downplaying the lethality of COVID-19, which has hit close to home. And they take a trip back to the 1995 Midwest heat wave that previewed the growing health risks of climate disruption.

Guinea Fowl and Tick Control

listen / download
Deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, a debilitating disease if left untreated, and one that’s becoming more common thanks to the warming climate. Now some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to guinea fowl to control ticks. Jenni Doering reports from Exeter, New Hampshire about one family’s experience with these tick-eating machines.

BirdNote®: The Paradise-Whydah

listen / download
Imagine if you had to grow your own evening gown just to attend a party. That's essentially what males of the East-African songbird species the Paradise-Whydah do every breeding season. These little finches sprout incredible tail feathers, many times the length of their bodies, all so the females of the species get to pick who wore it best. BirdNote®’s Mary McCann has the scoop.

Jane Goodall On 60+ Years of Conservation And Research

listen / download
The iconic Jane Goodall has spent her life advocating for the conservation of the natural world. Sixty years ago on July 14th, 1960, Jane arrived in what is now Gombe National Park, Tanzania, to begin her groundbreaking research on chimpanzees. Jane Goodall joins Steve Curwood to discuss her career studying chimps, the work her organization is doing now, and what we can learn about our relationship with the natural world from the current pandemic.


Special Features

Democratic Climate Action Plan

listen / download
House Democrats on the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis have released a massive climate action plan that aims to end carbon pollution and build new clean energy and transportation systems, while also helping communities adapt to climate disruption. Select Committee on the Climate Crisis Chair Kathy Castor (D-FL) joins Steve Curwood to discuss what the plan means for environmental policy and environmental justice communities moving forward. And as tickborne diseases like Lyme disease become more common in our warming climate, some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to guinea fowl to control the bloodthirsty arachnids.
Blog Series: The Podcast from Living On Earth

EPA Approves GMO Mosquito Trials + Court Finds EPA Violated Pesticide Safety Procedures

listen / download
EPA has given biotech company Oxitec the go-ahead to test the effectiveness of genetically modified mosquitoes in parts of Florida and Texas, generating environmental safety concerns. Also, a federal appellate court recently found EPA did not adequately consider risks and problems when it approved the herbicide Dicamba for new uses. That approval has created huge problems for farmers who do not use the chemical or who don’t want to buy seeds of genetically modified crops that can tolerate it.
Blog Series: The Podcast from Living On Earth

Dancing With Bees: A Journey Back to Nature

listen / download
The innate curiosity about and connection to the natural world that many of us experience as children are often lost on the path to adulthood. Author Brigit Strawbridge Howard found her way back to a childlike fascination with nature with the help of some of the world's most important pollinators: honeybees, bumblebees, and solitary bees. She shares tips for helping diverse bee species thrive in your own backyard.
Blog Series: The Podcast from Living On Earth


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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