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Public Radio's Environmental News Magazine (follow us on Google News)

Lobster Industry on the Hook to Save Right Whales

 

Entanglement in fishing gear for crab and lobster traps is one of the biggest threats to the critically endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. So, the Marine Stewardship Council recently suspended its sustainability certificate for the lobster fishery in the Gulf of Maine, which led Whole Foods to halt its sale of Maine lobsters. Nicole Ogrysko, Bangor News Correspondent for Maine Public Radio, discusses the impacts to Maine lobstermen.

 

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Entanglement in fishing gear for crab and lobster traps is one of the biggest threats to the critically endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. So, the Marine Stewardship Council recently suspended its sustainability certificate for the lobster fishery in the Gulf of Maine, which led Whole Foods to halt its sale of Maine lobsters. Nicole Ogrysko, Bangor News Correspondent for Maine Public Radio, discusses the impacts to Maine lobstermen.

Battle For the Sepik River

 

The Sepik River in Papua New Guinea is interwoven with the physical and spiritual lives of indigenous forest communities. But a plan to build a copper and gold mine along a tributary threatens the river and the 400,000 people living along it. Emmanuel “Manu” Peni, the coordinator of Project Sepik, tells about his community’s fight against the mining plan and efforts to keep Papua New Guinea’s longest river clean.

 

Read More »

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Low Ambition Climate Summit

 

The annual meeting of the UN Climate treaty parties in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt known as COP27 went two days into overtime as negotiators worked late into the night hammering out a consensus. While the sleep-deprived delegates did produce an unprecedented agreement for rich nations to pay for loss and damage from climate disasters in poor countries, COP27 added no new brakes to keep the Earth from hurtling past the 1.5 degrees Celsius warming target of the Paris Agreement.

 

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Breakthrough for Loss and Damage

 

One bright star from the recent UN climate treaty talks in Egypt (COP27) is the agreement for wealthy nations to create a fund to pay for “loss and damage” from impacts of the climate disruption to lower income countries. But no money has been provided yet to stricken nations and there are still plenty of details to be worked out.

 

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The Reign of Wolf 21

 

Wolf expert Rick McIntyre’s 2020 book "The Reign of Wolf 21" is the true love story of an alpha pair who lead their Yellowstone pack with grace, courage, and an unbreakable bond. We share the story of these remarkable wolves’ lives and what they can teach us about love, loyalty, and leadership.

 

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Climate at the Ballot Box

 

Steve Curwood and Environmental Health News’ Weekend Editor Peter Dykstra take a look at the 2022 midterms to analyze incoming Governors, outgoing Senators, and the only two ballot initiatives on climate.

 

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Climate Action Winner in the Golden State

 

California Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom handily won re-election and now has 4 more years to work towards his goal of achieving carbon neutrality in the state by 2045. Lauren Sanchez, Senior Climate Advisor to Governor Newsom, takes a look at California’s top climate priorities and how the Golden State intends to lead on climate amid an uncertain national political landscape.

 

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Join the Living on Earth Book Club on October 13th!

 

Bestselling science journalist Ed Yong joins us to talk about his new book. Click here to learn more and register!

 

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Celebrating 30 years of Living on Earth!

 

Host Steve Curwood in the Living on Earth studio

 

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Lobster Industry on the Hook to Save Right Whales


Entanglement in fishing gear for crab and lobster traps is one of the biggest threats to the critically endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. So, the Marine Stewardship Council recently suspended its sustainability certificate for the lobster fishery in the Gulf of Maine, which led Whole Foods to halt its sale of Maine lobsters. Nicole Ogrysko, Bangor News Correspondent for Maine Public Radio, discusses the impacts to Maine lobstermen.

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Maybe Like Dust Bowl Days? Low Water on the Mississippi


Shallow water linked to years of drought has severely limited navigation on the Mississippi River, making it harder for farmers to get their corn, soybeans, and wheat to market. Chad Hart, a professor of Agricultural Economics at Iowa State University in Ames, talks about the climate connections with the midwestern drought similar to the Dust Bowl Era and how it’s affecting food commodities.

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Battle For the Sepik River


The Sepik River in Papua New Guinea is interwoven with the physical and spiritual lives of indigenous forest communities. But a plan to build a copper and gold mine along a tributary threatens the river and the 400,000 people living along it. Emmanuel “Manu” Peni, the coordinator of Project Sepik, tells about his community’s fight against the mining plan and efforts to keep Papua New Guinea’s longest river clean.

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This Week’s Show
December 2, 2022
listen / download



Lobster Industry on the Hook to Save Right Whales

listen / download
Entanglement in fishing gear for crab and lobster traps is one of the biggest threats to the critically endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. So, the Marine Stewardship Council recently suspended its sustainability certificate for the lobster fishery in the Gulf of Maine, which led Whole Foods to halt its sale of Maine lobsters. Nicole Ogrysko, Bangor News Correspondent for Maine Public Radio, discusses the impacts to Maine lobstermen.

Climate Change and Your Health

listen / download
Extreme heat, severe storms, and wildfires are just a few of the impacts of climate change that can harm people, from cardiovascular disease to mental illness. So, healthcare advocates like Dr. Kimberly Humphrey, an emergency physician from Australia and a fellow at Harvard’s Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, are calling for a drastic reduction in fossil fuel use to avoid the worst of the climate crisis, and saying that the recent commitments promised at the COP27 climate talks fall short of what’s needed to keep people safe.

Maybe Like Dust Bowl Days? Low Water on the Mississippi

listen / download
Shallow water linked to years of drought has severely limited navigation on the Mississippi River, making it harder for farmers to get their corn, soybeans, and wheat to market. Chad Hart, a professor of Agricultural Economics at Iowa State University in Ames, talks about the climate connections with the midwestern drought similar to the Dust Bowl Era and how it’s affecting food commodities.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
Environmental Health News weekend editor Peter Dykstra and Steve Curwood talk about environmental voters in the runoff election in Georgia, a twenty-six-story pig farming building in the Hubei province of China, and the 1873 and 1952 killer fogs in London that killed thousands of people.

Battle For the Sepik River

listen / download
The Sepik River in Papua New Guinea is interwoven with the physical and spiritual lives of indigenous forest communities. But a plan to build a copper and gold mine along a tributary threatens the river and the 400,000 people living along it. Emmanuel “Manu” Peni, the coordinator of Project Sepik, tells about his community’s fight against the mining plan and efforts to keep Papua New Guinea’s longest river clean.

Listening on Earth

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The World Cup soccer games are in full swing in Qatar and around the world fans are tuning in to cheer on their country’s team. At the Cloud Forest School in Monteverde, Costa Rica school stopped mid-morning so students could watch Costa Rica play Spain.


Special Features

Field Note: Wishful Thinking - Leopards of the Olare Oruk River
Young leopards have a lot to learn. In the Maasai Mara, on the banks of the Olare Oruk River, Explorer in Residence Mark Seth Lender followed one such Young leopard progress along the learning curve.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Captive Audience
Cooperative hunting among birds is rare but Explorer in Residence Mark Seth Lender shares an unexpected instance among yellow-billed storks in Kenya.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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