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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Appeals Court Reluctantly Dismisses Youth Climate Case

 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently dismissed the Juliana v. United States case, originally filed in 2015 by youths and which sought to hold the federal government accountable for not doing enough to address climate change. Pat Parenteau of the Vermont Law School joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the tough decision the judges faced and what could be next for the youth climate case, which has already been before the US Supreme Court twice on procedural issues.

 

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The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently dismissed the Juliana v. United States case, originally filed in 2015 by youths and which sought to hold the federal government accountable for not doing enough to address climate change. Pat Parenteau of the Vermont Law School joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the tough decision the judges faced and what could be next for the youth climate case, which has already been before the US Supreme Court twice on procedural issues.

Redlining Linked with Extreme Urban Heat

 

In the 1930s, while the world was digging out of the Great Depression, the US government came up with a plan to rate neighborhoods based on their presumed suitability to receive home loans, with those considered riskiest outlined in red. These “redlined” neighborhoods tended to be in city centers and home to black Americans, and today as climate change exacerbates urban heat, they’re experiencing much higher temperatures than surrounding areas. Vivek Shandas is a lead author of the research and speaks with Bobby Bascomb about the unequal impacts of racist ‘redlining’ practices.

 

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Democratic Debaters United on Need For Climate Action

 

At the final Democratic primary debate before the 2020 Iowa caucuses, the six top polling candidates onstage all discussed their concerns about climate impacts and their plans for addressing the problem and broadly agreed on the need to address climate disruption. CNN and the Des Moines Register hosted the debate in Des Moines, Iowa, and Steve Curwood highlights the main climate change moments from the evening.

 

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Senator Lisa Murkowski Talks Up Public Lands

 

Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) is known for reaching across the aisle to broker bipartisan deals, including the bipartisan 2019 Dingell Act to protect and expand public lands. Steve Curwood and Senator Murkowski discuss the Dingell Act and her plans for her final year as Chair of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. They also cover her views on the Trump Administration’s plans to exempt the Tongass National Forest from the roadless rule, and the need to balance oil drilling and climate concerns in the state nicknamed “The Last Frontier”.

 

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Trump Moves to Weaken NEPA

 

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), forms the bedrock of environmental protection at the federal level. It was signed into law 50 years ago by President Richard Nixon and requires environmental review before federal agencies begin substantial new infrastructure projects that could cause or increase environmental harm. Now the Trump Administration says it wants to streamline procedures under NEPA to make it easier for large federal projects to move forward, but critics say it will gut certain environmental protections. Michael Gerrard, an environmental law professor at Columbia Law School, joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss.

 

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Australia's Wildfires Point to the Future

 

Australia is in the throes of its worst fire season in modern history. As thousands of homes are incinerated and an estimated billion animals perish, the world is getting a glimpse of our future in a warming world. Penn State University climatologist Michael Mann speaks from Sydney, where he is taking a sabbatical to study the influence of climate change on extreme weather events. Prof. Mann explains the clear link between climate disruption and wildfire disasters, and discusses Aussies’ frustration with the response of their government to the climate crisis.

 

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Romance and Spring Harvest At Paradise Lot

 

For most gardeners, springtime means a few seedlings on a window sill. But for perennial gardeners spring is a time of harvest. The new book, Paradise Lot, is a personal and heartwarming account of finding romance and growing a permaculture food forest on a degraded backyard plot in a gritty neighborhood of Holyoke, MA.

 

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Turkish Development Threatens Marine Life

 

Recent protests in Turkey were sparked by the government's plans to pave over a public park. Journalist Sulmaan Khan joins host Steve Curwood to explain how rapid development in Turkey is causing a host of environmental problems. (photo: bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Russia Nixes Antarctic Marine Reserve

 

Negotiators from 25 countries met in Germany recently in a bid to create a massive marine reserve in the seas around Antarctica. But at the last minute, Russia backed out of the deal.

 

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Appeals Court Reluctantly Dismisses Youth Climate Case

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently dismissed the Juliana v. United States case, originally filed in 2015 by youths and which sought to hold the federal government accountable for not doing enough to address climate change. Pat Parenteau of the Vermont Law School joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the tough decision the judges faced and what could be next for the youth climate case, which has already been before the US Supreme Court twice on procedural issues.

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A Plan to Avoid Extinctions

A recent United Nations biodiversity report comes to the sobering conclusion that as many as 1 million species are at risk of going extinct in the coming decades. In response the UN Convention on Biodiversity has released a new plan to avert the crisis. Tierra Curry from the Center for Biological Diversity joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the biodiversity crisis and plans to address it.

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Redlining Linked with Extreme Urban Heat

In the 1930s, while the world was digging out of the Great Depression, the US government came up with a plan to rate neighborhoods based on their presumed suitability to receive home loans, with those considered riskiest outlined in red. These “redlined” neighborhoods tended to be in city centers and home to black Americans, and today as climate change exacerbates urban heat, they’re experiencing much higher temperatures than surrounding areas. Vivek Shandas is a lead author of the research and speaks with Bobby Bascomb about the unequal impacts of racist ‘redlining’ practices.

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This Week’s Show
January 24, 2020
listen / download


Appeals Court Reluctantly Dismisses Youth Climate Case

listen / download
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently dismissed the Juliana v. United States case, originally filed in 2015 by youths and which sought to hold the federal government accountable for not doing enough to address climate change. Pat Parenteau of the Vermont Law School joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the tough decision the judges faced and what could be next for the youth climate case, which has already been before the US Supreme Court twice on procedural issues.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
In this week’s Beyond the Headlines segment, Peter Dykstra and Bobby Bascomb look at the European Union’s plan to become carbon neutral by 2050. Next, they turn to internet dating profiles and how users are matched based on their concern about climate change. Finally, in the history calendar, they look back ten years at the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision to roll back some restrictions on campaign financing.

A Plan to Avoid Extinctions

listen / download
A recent United Nations biodiversity report comes to the sobering conclusion that as many as 1 million species are at risk of going extinct in the coming decades. In response the UN Convention on Biodiversity has released a new plan to avert the crisis. Tierra Curry from the Center for Biological Diversity joins Bobby Bascomb to discuss the biodiversity crisis and plans to address it.

Mangroves Thriving in a Warming World

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Rising temperatures are enabling mangroves, resilient trees that grow in saltwater, to expand their range in Florida and beyond. Brendan Rivers of WJCT in Jacksonville reports.

BirdNote®: Laysan Albatrosses Nest at Midway Atoll

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Many of us may feel like hibernating through the winter, but for the Laysan Albatross, this is the perfect time to get to work on nesting and raising chicks. BirdNote®'s Mary McCann has more.

Norway’s Disappearing Winter

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Scandinavia is nearly synonymous with cold and snow, but a recent study from Norway shows that’s beginning to change. Reidun Skaland, a climate scientist from Norway’s Meteorological Institute, speaks with Bobby Bascomb on Norway’s lost winter days.

Redlining Linked with Extreme Urban Heat

listen / download
In the 1930s, while the world was digging out of the Great Depression, the US government came up with a plan to rate neighborhoods based on their presumed suitability to receive home loans, with those considered riskiest outlined in red. These “redlined” neighborhoods tended to be in city centers and home to black Americans, and today as climate change exacerbates urban heat, they’re experiencing much higher temperatures than surrounding areas. Vivek Shandas is a lead author of the research and speaks with Bobby Bascomb about the unequal impacts of racist ‘redlining’ practices.


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